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Top 10 Air Toxics in Vermont

The list of hazardous air contaminants below were selected as the "Top 10" because they either exceed Vermont's Hazardous Ambient Air Standard or they are of concern to the public. To view bar graphs depicting measurement data of air toxics monitoring data for the period 1996-2001, click on the name of the pollutant of interest.



The list of hazardous air pollutants above were selected as the "Top 10" because they either exceed Vermont's ambient air standard or they are of concern to the public. To view bar graphs depicting measurement data for the period 1996-2001 associated with a particular pollutant, click on a listed pollutant above. Ambient monitoring data for mercury covers the period 1993-1997. 

Note:

  • The Burlington monitoring site was closed in mid-June 2000 due to the construction of a supermarket on the site, but the APCD recommenced monitoring in Burlington on January 27, 2003 in the parking lot on the corner of South Winooski and Main Street. To view the new monitoring site, please click here.

  • The urban air toxics monitoring site in Lyndonville was added on 1/1/2001 and monitoring for VOCs and carbonyls continued for one year, through February 2002. This site is intended as a source-oriented styrene sampling site but simultaneously serves as a population-oriented monitoring site.

 

To read about the status of air toxics monitoring in Vermont, please click here.


Acetaldehyde

Mean Annual Concentrations Median Annual Concentrations Multiple Above Standard

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Benzene

Mean Annual Concentrations

Median Annual Concentrations

Multiple Above Standard

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1,3-Butadiene

Mean Annual Concentrations Median Annual Concentrations Multiple Above Standard

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Carbon Tetrachloride

Mean Annual Concentrations Median Annual Concentrations Multiple Above Standard

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Chloroform

Greater than 90% of measured chloroform concentrations were below the method minimum detection limit at all air toxics monitoring sites in Vermont during the period 1996-2001. Therefore, no bar charts are available. However, some monitoring data indicate that levels of chloroform in the ambient air may exceed the Hazardous Ambient Air Standard of 0.043 g/m3. For this reason, chloroform remains a hazardous air contaminant of concern.

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Formaldehyde

Mean Annual Concentrations

Median Annual Concentrations

Multiple Above Standard

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Methylene Chloride

Mean Annual Concentrations

Median Annual Concentrations

Multiple Above Standard

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Tetrachloroethylene

Greater than 90% of measured tetrachloroethylene concentrations were below the method minimum detection limit at all air toxics monitoring sites in Vermont during the period 1996-2001. Therefore, no bar charts are available. However, some monitoring data indicate that levels of tetrachloroethylene in the ambient air may exceed the Hazardous Ambient Air Standard of 0.41 g/m3. For this reason, tetrachloroethylene remains a hazardous air contaminant of concern.

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Mercury

Vapor Mercury

Mean Annual Concentrations

Median Annual Concentrations

 

Particulate Mercury

Mean Annual Concentrations

Median Annual Concentrations

The Hazardous Ambient Air Standard for Mercury Compounds is 0.12 g/m3, which is the same as 120 ng/m3 or 120,000 pg/m3 .

Measured concentrations of vapor and particulate mercury combined are two orders of magnitude lower than the HAAS. Nonetheless mercury was selected as a priority compound due to concerns surrounding this contaminant on the state and national level.

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Styrene

Mean Annual Concentrations Median Annual Concentrations Multiple Above Standard *

* Ambient air concentrations of styrene do not exceed the current Hazardous Ambient Air Standard (512 g/m3). Styrene was selected as a priority compound due to local public concern regarding the adequacy of the current standard.

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Return to Air Toxics Program Page

 

Last Updated: 2/4/03

 

   
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