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Woodstove Facts

5

    Since the late 1980s, between 1/3 and 1/2 of all Vermont households have utilized wood for some or all of their space heating needs (Source: adapted from VT DPS – Vermont Residential Fuel Wood Assessment 1997-1998).

5

    In most areas of the country, woodburning from fireplaces and woodstoves is the largest source of particulate matter air pollution (PM) generated by residential sources. In some localities, fireplaces and woodstoves have been identified as the source of 80% or more of all ambient particles smaller than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5) during the winter months (Source:  American Lung Association) 

1

    Breathing air containing wood smoke can:  Irritate eyes, lungs, throat and sinuses; Reduce lung function, especially in young children; Increase severity of existing lung diseases such as asthma, emphysema, pneumonia and bronchitis; Increase risks of heart attacks; Trigger headaches and allergies. 

2

    Upgrade to an EPA-certified woodstove or other clean burning technology – Certified, cleaner-burning stoves emit 70 percent less (on average) particle pollution than older, less-efficient stoves (or fireplace inserts).  They also use approximately 30 percent less wood (Source: adapted from US EPA http://www.epa.gov/woodstoves/pdfs/epa_bcflyer_press_rev4.pdf)

3

    Less smoke means less creosote. This gives two important benefits. First, the chance of chimney fire is virtually eliminated, as long as the stove is operated correctly and reasonable maintenance is done. And second, the flue pipe and chimney will need cleaning much less frequently, which is another way the new technology stoves save time and money. (Source : Woodheat.org) 
3

    Choose the right size stove.  A stove that is too large for a room will need to be dampered down so it doesn’t overheat the space.  This can waste wood and produce unnecessary smoke, which in turn wastes your money. (Source: adapted from US EPA http://www.epa.gov/woodstoves/pdfs/epa_bcflyer_press_rev4.pdf)

4

    Always burn small hot fires.  These fires provide the maximum in heat, while cutting fuel consumption and reducing pollution. (Source: US EPA http://www.epa.gov/woodstoves/pdfs/epa_bcflyer_press_rev4.pdf)

Click Here to View the EPA "Burn Clean" Woodstove Flyer

 

Return To Woodstove Rebate Page

 

SPONSORED BY THE

VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION

           AIR POLLUTION CONTROL DIVISION

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